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Marblehead Arts Association logo

'Morrie's Massage'
awarded 1st Prize for Photography
Variations Exhibition 2024


Juror:  Karen Haas Boston Museum of Fine Arts

Morrie Schwartz enjoying his 'Living Memorial'

Book Talks/Signing

I am looking for venues for 'Book Talks'  

 

In addition to learning about my collaboration with Morrie, we will talk about love and loss and in the process, build connections.

 

Send me an email if you have an idea for a venue at heather@heatherpillar.com

Morrie at his 'Living Memorial' arranged by his friends, colleagues and former students.

AFCC's Creative Exchange logo

Season 5/Episode 4: Heather Pillar | Camera as a passport (May 2023)

If a picture is truly worth a thousand words, then Heather Pillar (Pil-ár) has countless stories to tell over a 25-year career that has led the talented photojournalist across seven countries in four continents, highlighted by her moving portrait series, memento Morrie: images of love and loss, spotlighting the last six months of Brandeis professor Morrie Schwartz’s (of Tuesdays with Morrie fame) life.

Spotify logo
Apple podcast logo
Arts Foundation Cape Cod
Heather Pillar at FotoNostrum in Barcelona, Spain

Exhibition of Heather Pillar's images - 2 honorable mentions
FotoNostrum, 
Barcelona, Spain

FotoNostrum Mediterranean House of Photography, Barcelona (logo)

2oth annual 

Julia Margaret Cameron Awards

April-May 2023

JMCA was juried by renowned photojournalist,

Barbara Davidson,

3x Pulitzer Prize and Guggenheim Fellow.

Rob Schwartz gives his father Morrie one of many tender kisses.

Next Avenue

an AARP publication

April 14, 2023

Nearly 30 Years After His Death,

Morrie Schwartz Offers New Life Lessons

by Richard Harris

From the subject of 'Tuesdays with Morrie,' the discovery of a manuscript on aging creatively leads to a new book 'The Wisdom of Morrie'

NBC's TODAY
with Hoda and Jenna

September 27, 2022

In honor of the 25th anniversary of “Tuesdays With Morrie,” author Mitch Albom opens up about how the book changed his own life, as well as the lives of millions of readers. “He’s on my shoulder everyday of my life,” Albom says about the advice he got from his beloved teacher.

NBC Today Show with Hoda and Jenna featured photo of Mitch and Morrie
CBS Sunday Morning piece Sept 25, 2022

Former broadcast journalist Ted Koppel interviews Mitch Albom, author of Tuesdays with Morrie. (approx 8 minute segment)

Koppel asked, "It has crossed all kinds of cultural, ethnic, religious, racial boundaries. What are people getting out of it that they don't get out of most books?"

"Well, I've learned that the appeal of 'Tuesdays with Morrie' isn't my writing. I'm not Mark Twain! It's the story of a younger person who's a little lost and an older person who's about to leave the world who says: 'Let me tell you what I've learned.' Almost everybody can find themselves in one of those two characters.

CBS Sunday Morning
September 25, 2022
NPR All Things Considered article August 22, 2022
NPR All Things Considered
August 21,2022

As he faced death, Schwartz offered lessons in life.

Among Schwartz' regrets during his conversations with Albom was how young people grasped onto what he called "the major cultural values, like money status and power ... and then you find out it's not a good life. It's too empty. There's no real substantial meaning but by that time it's too late."

Boston Globe
March 15, 2015

A PROFESSOR’S FINAL COURSE: HIS OWN DEATH

by Richard Harris

The story of a retired Brandeis sociology professor, stricken with ALS — Lou Gehrig’s disease — who was given 12 to 18 months to live, was surprisingly upbeat. Rather than curling up in the fetal position, Morrie Schwartz irreverently held a memorial service for himself so he could hear friends tell him what he meant to them while he was still alive. Always the teacher, Morrie — that’s what he wanted to be called — decided to use whatever time he had left to conduct an ongoing class for friends and colleagues who’d stop by his Newton home — lessons on how to live as he stared death in the face.

Boston Globe article: A PROFESSOR’S FINAL COURSE: HIS OWN DEATH
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